Home ~

Abbeville County | West Historical Markers Tour

Abbeville County | West Historical Markers Tour

 


BIRTHPLACE OF CALHOUN

  • Map Marker #:  W-01 (Abbeville County West Tour)
  • Marker Erected:  1962 by Abbeville Historical Society
  • Marker Text: On this land settled by his father Patrick Calhoun in the 1750s, John Caldwell Calhoun, American statesman and champion of the old South, was born, March 18, 1789, and nurtured to young manhood. Patrick defended the land against the Indians in the Cherokee War and the enemies of liberty in the American Revolution.
  • Location: Approximately 7 miles South of the City of Abbeville on Mt. Carmel Road (SC Highway 823), approximately 3.6 miles from the intersection of S-1-498
  • Coordinates: N 34° 3.598   082° 26.98

 


View Larger Map


PATRICK CALHOUN FAMILY BURIAL GROUND

  • Map Marker #: W-02 (Abbeville County West Tour)
  • Marker Erected: 1953
  • Marker Text: 5.5 miles south of Abbeville is the burial ground of Patrick and Martha Calhoun, parents of John C. Calhoun. Patrick was made deputy surveyor, 1756; first representative from Up-Country to Commons House of Assembly, 1769-1772; member of First Provincial Congress, 1775; of the Second, 1775-1776; of the General Assembly, 1776, and frequently thereafter until his death, 1796. His greatest service to his state was his successful fight for the Circuit Court Act of 1769. Across the road opposite the burial ground is his home site.
  • Location: Intersection of SC Highway 823 and SC Highway 72
  • Coordinates:  34° 8.102′ N, 82° 24.856′ W


View Larger Map


MILLWOOD HOME OF JAMES EDWARD CALHOUN

Note: This marker sign has been removed

  • Map Marker #: W-03 (Abbeville County West Tour)
  • Marker Erected: 1953
  • Marker Text: Half mile southeast is Millwood, home of James Edward Calhoun, 1796-1898, son of John Ewing and Floride Bonneau Calhoun and brother-in-law of John C. Calhoun. After serving as lieutenant in the U. S. Navy, he developed Millwood, which ultimately included 25,000 acres. Seeing the value of Trotter’s Shoals, a part of this estate, he was among the first to encourage the use of Southern water power.
  • Location: SC Highway 72 at the Savannah River Bridge West of Calhoun Falls and approximately 2.9 miles from the Intersection of SC Highway 823 and SC Highway 72
  • Coordinates: 34.071° N    82.637° W


View Larger Map


OLIN D. JOHNSON MEMORIAL BOULEVARD

  • Map Marker #: W-04 (Abbeville County West Tour)
  • Marker Erected: 1985
  • Marker Text:  Named in honor of a distinguished South Carolinian in recognition of his contributions to the life and welfare of this state and its citizens. Member, House of Representatives: 1923-1924 Anderson County; 1927-1930 Spartanburg County. Governor: 1935-1939; 1943-1945. United States Senator: 1945-1965. He worked tirelessly for development of the Savannah River Basin. Erected in 1985, the 50th Anniversary of his first inauguration as governor.
  • Location: SC Highway 72 at the Savannah River Bridge West of Calhoun Falls and approximately 2.9 miles from the Intersection of SC Highway 823 and SC Highway 72
  • Coordinates: 34.071° N    W 82.636° W


View Larger Map


W.D. NIXON BRIDGE

  • Map Marker #:W-05 (Abbeville County West Tour)
  • Marker Erected: 1982
  • Marker Text:  Named in 1982 in honor of a dedicated public servant and ardent supporter of the construction of Richard B. Russell Dam Member, S.C. House 1949 — 1953. Served also as Chairman, Abbeville County Council, Mayor, Lowndesville, County Chairman, Democratic Party.
  • Location: Near intersection of SC Highway 81 and SC Highway 71
  • Coordinates: 34° 12.748 N     82° 37.849 W


View Larger Map


WILLAM BARTRAM TRAIL

  • Map Marker #: W-06 (Abbeville County West Tour)
  • Marker Erected: By Garden Club of South Carolina in Cooperation with the Department of Highways & Public Transportation of S.C.
  • Marker Text: In 1775, William Bartram visited several days at “Lough-Abber” home of A. Cameron, en route north to the Cherokee country.
  • Location: Approximately .82 miles from the intersection of SC Highway 71 and S-1-63 in Lowndesville
  • Coordinates: 34° 12.583′ N 82° 30.35′ W


View Larger Map


LOWNDESVILLE

  • Map Marker #: W-07 (Abbeville County West Tour)
  • Marker Erected: 2006 by Town of Lowndesville
  • Marker Text:  Front: This town, established in 1823, grew up around a store owned by Matthew Young (1803-1878), who was also postmaster 1831-43. It was first called Pressly’s Station, for the post office opened in 1823 with David Pressly (1764-1834) as postmaster. The town was renamed Rocky River in 1831 and then Lowndesville in 1836 for William Lowndes (1782-1822), U.S. Congressman 1811-22.  Reverse: Lowndesville, incorporated in 1839, had about 150 inhabitants then and 150-350 inhabitants for most of its history. Cotton was the major crop in the area, with bales ginned here and shipped by the Charleston & Western Carolina Railway. In 1890 Lowndesville included a hotel, nine general stores, a grocery, a dry goods store, a drugstore, a stable, and three saw mills.
  • Location: Main Street (SC Highway 81) in the Town of Lowndesville
  • Coordinates:  34° 12.627′ N 82° 38.71′ W


View Larger Map


PARSONS MOUNTAIN

  • Map Marker #: W-08 (West Abbeville County Tour)
  • Marker Erected: 2010 South Carolina Heritage Corridor
  • Marker Text:  At 832 feet, Parsons Mountain holds the title of the highest point in the general geographic area surrounding Parsons Mountain. Mr. James Parsons, the mountain’s namesake, acquired it through a land grant in 1772. In the mid 1800s, gold was discovered on the mountain, further adding interest to the area. Long before Mr. Parsons, American Indians lived in and used these rich, productive forests. Settlers in the 1770s worked the land, obtaining what they could from agricultural practices, and cleared most of the timber. By 1920, severe soil erosion created abandoned fields, deep gullies, and soil-filled streams. From this worn out land, the Sumter National Forest was started in 1936. The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) planted trees, repaired gullies, fought wildfires, and built roads. In 1935 the CCC built the fire tower on Parsons Mountain and in 1940 they began construction on this lake and recreation area. From its beginning, the Sumter National Forest has provided clean water, timber, wildlife habitat, jobs, and recreation sites for its communities. Parsons Mountain Recreation Area is an example that if resources are used wisely they can be enjoyed generation after generation.
  • Location: Campground Road, Sumter National Forest
  • Coordinates: 34° 5.875 N   82° 21.433  W


View Larger Map

Copyright © 2015 Abbeville County Historical Society | Website Development: Shawn M. Knox Images